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David Caudell, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Program Graduate 2008

photo of David CaudellCurrent Position:  Associate Director of the Center for Comparative Medicine Research, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC   http://www.linkedin.com/pub/david-caudell-dvm-phd/36/840/5a3                  http://www.wakehealth.edu/Faculty/Caudell-David-L.ht                        Publications                                                                                                    Dr. Caudell was a graduate fellow in the NCI molecular pathology GPP in partnership with University of Maryland from 2003-2008.  He completed his dissertation research in the Genetics Branch, under the mentorship of Peter Aplan, M.D.
Thesis Title:
“Development of a mouse model for the t(10;11)(p13;q14) chromosomal translocation associated with acute leukemia in humans.”  

Dr. Caudell received his D.V.M. degree from Virginia Tech in 2000, followed by a residency in Anatomic Pathology in the Department of Pathobiology at Oklahoma State University, completed in 2003. Following his residency, Dr. Caudell pursued graduate training in comparative molecular pathology through the Graduate Partnership Program at the National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. He completed his dissertation research in mouse models of human leukemia in the Genetics Branch, Leukemogenesis Section headed by Peter D. Aplan, M.D. Dr. Caudell defended his dissertation research and was awarded his Ph.D. degree from the University of Maryland in June 2008. The title of his Ph.D. dissertation is "Development of a mouse model for the t(10;11)(p13;q14) chromosomal translocation associated with acute leukemia in humans". Members of his graduate committee included: Siba K. Samal, B.V.Sc. Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Microbiologists (Chair); Peter D. Aplan, M.D. (Co-Chair); Nathanial Tablante, D.V.M.,M.S., Diplomate, The American College of Poultry Veterinarians; R. Mark Simpson, D.V.M., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists; Iqbal Hamza, Ph.D. and Nickolas Zimmerman, Ph.D. After receiving his Ph.D., Dr. Caudell continued his research as a tenure track Assistant Professor in Pathology, in the Department of Pathobiology and Biomedical Sciences at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA.  He remained in Blacksburg from 2009-2013.  In January, 2013, he continued to pursue his career as an assistant professor at Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston Salem, North Carolina. After two years of helping to build reserach programs and resources there, he has been named the new Associate Director of the Center for Comparative Medicine Research.  

 

Mark J. Hoenerhoff, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Diplomate, ACVP
Program Graduate 2008

Current Position:  Associate Professor, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/mark-hoenerhoff/10/41a/663              http://medicine.umich.edu/medschool/research/office-research/unit-laboratory-animal-medicine-ulam/contact-ulam/ulam-faculty/hoenerhoff-mark                      Publications                                                                                                 Dr. Hoenerhoff was a graduate fellow in the NCI molecular pathology GPP in partnership with Michigan State University from 2004-2008.
Thesis Title:
“BMI1 collaborates with HRAS to promote mammary tumorigenesis and metastasis.”

Dr. Hoenerhoff received his DVM from Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine in 1998, followed by three years working as a clinician in a small animal and emergency practice. In 2001, Dr. Hoenerhoff returned to Michigan State University to pursue a residency in anatomic veterinary pathology in the Department of Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation. Following completion of his residency, Dr. Hoenerhoff received board certification in by The American College of Veterinary Pathologists in 2004, while pursuing graduate training in comparative pathology through the Graduate Partnership Program at the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. His dissertation research focused on breast cancer biology, breast cancer stem cells, and genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models of breast cancer in the Transgenic Oncogenesis Laboratory, led by Jeffrey Green, M.D., in the Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics. Dr. Hoenerhoff defended his dissertation research and received his PhD degree from Michigan State University in May of 2008. The title of his Ph.D. dissertation is “BMI1 collaborates with HRAS to promote mammary tumorigenesis and metastasis”. Members of his graduate guidance committee included: Thomas Mullaney, D.V.M. Ph.D., The American College of Veterinary Pathologists, (Chair); Kurt Williams, D.V.M., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists; P.S. MohanKumar, B.V.Sc., Ph.D; Michael Scott, D.V.M., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists; Vilma Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Ph.D.; Jeff Green, M.D. and Mark Simpson, D.V.M., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists.  Following completion of his Ph.D., Dr. Hoenerhoff joined the Cellular and Molecular Pathology Branch at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in the Research Triangle Park, NC, as Head of Investigative Pathology (2008-2013). His research focused on genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of chemically induced carcinogenesis and toxicity in National Toxicology Program (NTP) studies.  He has now returned to Michigan, his home state, where he accepted a position at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI as an associate professor.      

 

Kevin Woolard, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Diplomate, ACVP
Program Graduate 2010

Photo of Kevin WoolardCurrent Position:  Assistant Professor of the Pathology, Microbiology & Immunoglogy, University of California, Davis School of Veteriary Medicine
http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/faculty/results.cfm?fid=21117 
Publications                                                                                                  
Dr. Woolard was a graduate scholar in the NCI Molecular Pathology GPP in partnership with the North Carolina State University and the National Cancer Institute, from 2003 - 2010.
Thesis Title:
“Comparative genomics of canine and human glioma stem cells: the dog faithfully recapitulates genomic alterations driving human glioblastoma.”

Dr. Woolard graduated from veterinary school at North Carolina State in 2003.  Following graduation, Dr. Woolard remained at the College of Veterinary Medicine, entered the molecular pathology GPP as a Cancer Research Training Fellow and undertook graduate course work and training in anatomic pathology. During his diagnostic pathology training he formed an interest in neuro-pathology and in neural stem cell biology. Following these interests, he completed his Ph.D. dissertation research in the comparative genomics driving canine and human gliomagenesis, focusing on the establishment of the dog as a spontaneous model for human gliomagenesis, in the Neuro-Oncology Branch headed by Howard Fine, M.D. in Bethesda, MD.  Dr. Woolard’s graduate committee was headed by Howard A. Fine, M.D., head of the Neuro-Oncology Branch.  Other members of his graduate committee included: John Cullen, V.M.D., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists; Matthew Breen, Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists; Dave Malarkey, D.V.M., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists; and Mark Simpson D.V.M., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists.  After receiving his Ph.D. he continued his research in the Fine laboratory comparing canine and human glioma stem cells to physiologic embryonic and adult canine neural stem cells, to elicit signaling pathways involved in self-renewal commonly expressed in both populations. He believes the dog represents a unique opportunity for meaningful comparative research of this spontaneous, heterogeneous tumor in humans through its remarkable genetic and physiologic similarity to human disease. Through comparative Genomic analysis and investigation into self-renewal signaling pathways shared between human and canine glioma stem cells, and ultimately canine embryonic stem cells, he hopes not only to better understand the process of glioma development and progression, but also to identify future molecular targets for therapeutic intervention.  Dr. Woolard is currently an assistant professor of Pathology, Microbiology & Immunology at the University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.                                                                        

 

Heather Shive, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Diplomate, ACVP
Program Graduate 2010

Photo of Heather ShiveCurrent Position:  Assistant Professor, North Carolina State University, Raliegh, NC
http://www.ncsu.edu/directory/moreinfo.php?username=hrshive http://www.linkedin.com/pub/heather-shive/35/251/153                            Publications                                                                                                 Dr. Shive was a graduate scholar in the NCI molecular pathology GPP in partnership with the University of Maryland and the National Cancer Institute, from 2006 to 2010.
Thesis Title:
“Modeling germline brca2 mutations in zebrafish.”               

Dr. Shive received her B.S. from the University of Arizona and her D.V.M from North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine in 2004. Following graduation, she joined the residency program in anatomic pathology in the Department of Pathobiology at Texas A&M University, College of Veterinary Medicine, wehre she trained for two years. She was accepted as a graduate fellow in molecular pathology through the Graduate Partnership Program (GPP) at the National Cancer Institute in 2006. While pursuing graduate training at the NCI, she achieved board certification in Anatomic Pathology by the American College of Veterinary Pathologists in 2007. Dr. Shive completed her dissertation research in the research laboratory of Dennis Hickstein, M.D., in the Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch at the NCI. The dissertation project was focused on investigating germline mutations in the breast cancer-2 gene (brca2) in the zebrafish (Danio rerio). These studies revealed a critical role for brca2 in ovarian development, and provide new insights into brca2 mutation and cancer susceptibility. Members of her graduate guidance committee included: Siba Samal, BVSc, Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Microbiologists (chair); Dennis Hickstein, M.D.; Paul Liu, M.D., Ph.D. (NHGRI); Mark Simpson, D.V.M, Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists; Liangli Yu, Ph.D. and Xiaoping Zhu, D.V.M, Ph.D. After receiving her Ph.D. in 2010, Dr. Shive accepted a Staff Scientist position in the NCI, CCR, Transplantation and Immunology Branch, where she continued her cancer research using the zebrafish model.  She is currently pursuing her career as an assistant professor at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.                                                                                                                                            

 

Schantel (Hayes) Bouknight, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Diplomate, ACVP
Program Graduate 2010

Photo of Schantel HayesCurrent Position: Veterinary Pathologist, Charles River Laboratories, Raleigh-Durham, NC
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/schantel-hayes/22/b90/17
Publications
Dr. (Hayes) Bouknight was a graduate Scholar in the NCI Molecular Pathology Graduate Partnership Program in partnership with Michigan State University and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, from 2005 – 2010.
Thesis Title:
“Identification and characterization of novel regulators of adipogenesis.”

Dr. (Hayes) Bouknight received her B.S. from Fort Valley State University and her D.V.M. from Tuskegee University in 2004. After graduation, Dr. Hayes (Bouknight) pursued a residency in anatomic pathology in the Department of Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation at Michigan State University. In 2005, she was accepted into the NCI Molecular Pathology Graduate Partnership Program to continue graduate course work and training as a diagnostic pathologist at MSU. Following completion of her diagnostic training and course work, Dr. Hayes (Bouknight) accomplished board certification in anatomic pathology by The American College of Veterinary Pathologists in 2007. She then relocated to the NIH, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD to begin her dissertation research. Her research focused on the transcriptional regulation of adipocyte differentiation in a laboratory headed by Elisabetta Muller, Ph.D., within the NIDDK Genetics of Development and Disease Branch. Members of her graduate guidance committee included: Matti Kiupel D.V.M, Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists (chair), Elisabetta Mueller, Ph.D., James Wagner,M.B.A., Ph.D., and Mark Simpson, D.V.M, Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists. After receiving her Ph.D., Dr. (Hayes) Bouknight was employed by Lexicon Pharmaceuticals as a veterinary pathologist.  She now resides in Raleigh-Durham, NC where she serves as a veterinary pathologist for Charles River Laboratories.                           

 

                                                  

Yava Jones-Hall, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Diplomate, ACVP
Program Graduate 2010

Photo Yava JonesCurrent Position: Assistant Professor, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/yava-jones-hall/2b/982/48b       http://www.purdue.edu/vet/directory/person.php?id=73
Publications                                                                                                  
Dr. Jones-Hall was a graduate scholar in the NCI Molecular Pathology GPP in partnership with Michigan State University and the National Cancer Institute, from 2004-2006 and 2007-2010.
Thesis Title: “The role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in acute colitis and colitis-associated colon cancer.”

Dr. Jones-Hall obtained a bachelors of arts from Talladega College in 1999 and her doctorate of veterinary medicine from Tuskegee University in 2003. She pursued an anatomic pathology residency at Michigan State University. In 2004, she was accepted into the NCI Molecular Pathology Graduate Partnership Program to continue her graduate course work and training as a diagnostic pathologist at MSU. Captain Jones interrupted her Cancer Research Training Award training at MSU from 2006-2007 to deploy to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom with the United States Army Veterinary Corps. Following active duty, she returned to the program to pursue her Ph.D. dissertation research in the Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, at the National Cancer Institute located in Frederick, MD. Dr. Jones-Hall’s research topic involved studying the role of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α in the development and propagation of chemically induced colitis and colon cancer using mouse models. Her NIH principal investigator (PI) mentor was Giorgio Trinchieri, M.D. Her graduate committee members included: Dr. Trinchieri, Matti Kiupel, Dr. Med. Vet, Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists, Vilma Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Ph.D., Alison Bauer, Ph.D., and Mark Simpson, D.V.M., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists. Dr. Jones-Hall has an appointment as an assistant professor at Purdue University.                                    

 

Tanasa S. Osborne, D.V.M., Ph.D.                                                           Diplomate, ACVP
Program Graduate 2011

Photo of Tanasa OsborneCurrent Position:  Toxicologic Pathology Research Fellow, National Toxicologic Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Research Triangle Park, NC
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/tanasa-s-osborne/79/671/872
Publications
Dr. Osborne was a graduate scholar in the NCI molecular pathology GPP in partnership with the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and the National Cancer Institute, from 2006 to 2010.
Thesis Title: “Role of elf4E in osteosarcoma metastasis.”

Dr. Tanasa Osborne received her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) from Tuskegee University College of Veterinary Medicine in 2002. That same year, Dr. Osborne entered a combined residency/PhD training program in anatomic pathology with an emphasis on toxicologic pathology in the Department of Pathobiology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Upon completion of her residency in 2006 Dr. Osborne began graduate training in comparative pathology through the GPP at the NCI, Bethesda, MD. Her PhD dissertation research in metastasis biology was carried out in the Tumor and Metastasis Biology Section, headed by Chand Khanna, DVM, PhD in the Pediatric Oncology Branch. Her model system included using a transplantable syngeneic mouse model characterized by orthotopic growth of osteosarcoma in BALB/c mice at appendicular sites with spontaneous metastasis to the lung. She used this model to study the role of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in the various steps of the metastatic cascade in osteosarcoma. The title of her dissertation was “The role of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in osteosarcoma metastasis”. Members of her graduate guidance committee included: Wanda Haschek-Hock, BVSc, PhD, Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Pathologists and American Board of Toxicologists (Chair), Chand Khanna, DVM, PhD, Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Matthew A. Wallig, DVM, PhD, Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Pathologists, Lois L. Hoyer, PhD, and Timothy M. Fan, DVM, PhD, Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.  Dr. Osborne joined the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Pathology Group at the National Institutes of Health Sciences (NIEHS) in 2012 as a Toxicologic Pathology Research Fellow. In her current position, she participates in the design, evaluation, and interpretation of toxicity and carcinogenicity studies conducted at NTP contracted laboratories.  She has gained invaluable experience in rodent toxicology studies and has been able to contribute to the establishment of standards, nomenclature, and diagnostic criteria for rodent pathology.  Her fellowship has allowed continued education toward enhancing molecular pathology techniques and specialized training in hepatobiliary toxicology.                                                                          

 

Philip Martin, M.S., D.V.M., Ph.D.                                                           Diplomate, ACVP                                                                                      Program Graduate 2014

Photo of Martin PhilipCurrent Position: Investigative Pathologist, NCI's Center for Advanced Preclinical Research, Frederick, MD
https://ccr.cancer.gov/capr/teams/animal-research-support                                        Publications
Dr. Martin was a graduate scholar in the NIH Comparative Biomedical Scientist Training Program in partnership with University of Maryland and the National Cancer Institute, 2005 – 2014.
Thesis Title: "Metabolic changes associated with androgen independent growth in a mouse model of prostate cancer."

Dr. Martin received his B.S. from Northwestern University, his M.S. from Ohio University and his D.V.M. from Kansas State University in 2003. After completing the D.V.M. Dr. Martin went to the University of California, Davis for residency training in anatomic pathology in the Department of Veterinary Pathology. As an anatomic pathology resident Dr. Martin pursued specialty track training in the pathology of laboratory animals and undertook training in the UC Davis Comparative Pathology Laboratory and the Pathology Department of the California Regional Primate Center. In 2005 Dr. Martin began training in comparative pathology through the Graduate Partnership Program at the National Cancer Institute, Bethesda MD. The first year of the GPP program was spent completing graduate course work at the University of Maryland and in additional anatomic pathology training while working in the Comparative Molecular Pathology Unit with Dr. Mark Simpson. Dr. Martin accomplished board certification in Anatomic Pathology by The American College of Veterinary Pathologists in 2006. Dr. Martin is carried out his dissertation research in the NCI Laboratory of Genitourinary Cancer Pathogenesis, headed by Kathy Kelly, PhD. His Ph.D. dissertation research involved developing an in-vivo bioluminescent transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer metastasis for the purpose of investigating the molecular signaling mechanisms responsible for driving prostate cancer metastasis. Members of his graduate guidance committee included Siba Samal, B.V.Sc., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Microbiologists (chair), Xiaoping Zhu, D.V.M., Ph.D., Robert Dooling, Ph.D., Kathy Kelly, Ph.D., and Mark Simpson, D.V.M., Ph.D, Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists. Dr. Martin is currently the veterinary pathologist for the NCI Frederick’s Center for Advanced Preclinical Research.

 

Ian Moore, D.V.M., Ph.D.                                                                        Diplomate, ACVP                                                                                  Program Graduate 2014

Photo of Ian MooreCurrent Position: Chief, Infectious Disease Pathogenesis Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Rockville, MD
Publications
Dr. Moore was a scholar in the NIH Comparative Biomedical Scientist Training Program in partnership with Michigan State University and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, 2007-2014.
Thesis Title:
"Pathologic and immunologic responses of the ferret to wild-type influenza virus infections."

Dr. Moore received his B.S. from Tuskegee University and his DVM from Tuskegee University School of Veterinary Medicine in 2006, and following graduation, entered a residency in anatomic pathology the Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health, Michigan State University. Following completion of initial diagnostic pathology training, Dr. Moore carried out his Ph.D. diossertation work in the NIAID’s Laboratory of Infectious Disease (LID) where, under the guidance of Dr. Kanta Subbarao, he studied the pathologic and immunologic responses of the ferret to wild-type Influenza virus infection. Dr. Moore’s PhD committee was chaired by Kurt Williams DVM, Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists.

Dr. Moore presented his work, “The Association of Age and Clinical Disease in Ferrets Infected with Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus”, at the 32nd annual meeting of the American Society for Virology, State College, PA, July 20-24, 2013. He also presented at the American College of Veterinary Pathologists’ November 2013 meeting in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. His talk was titled, “Avian Influenza Virus And Central Nervous System (CNS) Infection In Ferrets: A Proposed Novel Route For CNS Invasion”.

His research interests include mechanisms of infectious disease in animal models.  He is currenlty employed by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases as a veterinary pathologist, in Rockville, MD.

 

A. Sally Davis, D.V.M., Ph.D.                                                                  Program Graduate 2014

Current Position: Assistant Professor for Experimental Pathology, Kansas State University, Manhatten, KS
Publications
http://www.vet.k-state.edu/education/dmp/faculty-staff/faculty/davis-s/
Dr. Davis was a graduate scholar in the NIH Comparative Biomedical Scientist Training Program in partnership with North Carolina State University and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, 2007-2014.                                                                                    Thesis Title: "Improving experimental models for the study of influenza A pathogenesis."                      

She conducted her Ph.D. dissertation research in the laboratory of Dr. Jeffery K. Taubenberger, M.D.,Ph.D., Viral Pathogenesis and Evolution Section, Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH. Dr. Davis received her D.V.M. and Residency Certificate in Veterinary Anatomic Pathology in 2007 and 2009 respectively from North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine. She also has a BA in Computer Science modified with education and a graduate certificate in secondary school science education from Dartmouth College. Her most recent research focused on comparative pathogenesis and response of a diversity of mammalian species to a variety of influenza A viruses, including reconstructed 1918 and 2009 H1N1 pandemic strains. Additionally, she studied the interspecies variability in host response to influenza A virus via in vivo experimentation, digital and light histopathology, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. While at NIAID, she focused on methods development in the following areas:  diminishing autofluorescence in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, multi-label antibody and lectin based immunofluorescence, and validation of the in vitro cell models against human/animal tissues of origin.  This work led to additional collaborations in other areas of respiratory pathology.  Her graduate committee members included: Jeffery Taubenberger, M.D., Ph.D. (co-chair), J. Mac Law, D.V.M., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists (co-chair), James Shelhamer, M.D., Deputy Chief, Critical Care Medicine Department, Clinical Center, NIH and Fred Fuller, Ph.D., North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine.

Dr. Davis is continuing her research as the Assistant Professor for Experimental Veterinary Pathology at Kansas State University.  While there she also plans to broaden her pathology focus to include research on additional emerging and zoonotic diseases in support of CEEZAD (The Center of Excellence for Emerging and Zoonotic Animal Diseases).

 

Joy Gary, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Diplomate, ACVP
Program Graduate 2015

Photo of Joy GaryCurrent Position: Veterinary Pathologist, Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA
Publications 
Dr. Gary was a graduate scholar in the NIH Comparative Biomedical Scientist Training Program in partnership with Michigan State University and the National Cancer Institute, 2009 - 2015.
Thesis Title: "Phenotypic characterization of allelic variants of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)."                                                                                                   Joy Gary received her B.S. in biology from Davidson College in North Carolina (2005) and her DVM from Colorado State University in 2009. She completed her didactic graduate studies and core diagnostic experience in veterinary anatomic pathology at Michigan State University. She continued her training in pathology and research in the Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics for her dissertation work under the mentorship of Dr. Beverly Mock. She studied the role of an allelic variant of mTOR in BALB/c mice (R628C; C1977T) on the function of the protein as a kinase and in DNA damage repair.  She utilized a mouse that expresses the BALB/c allele of mTOR on a BL6;129 background to explore this allelic variant.  Members of her graduate committee included: Matti Kiupel, Dr. Med. Vet., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists (ACVP), Michigan State University; Beverly Mock, Ph.D, LCBG, NCI; Vilma Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Ph.D., Michigan State University; Jennifer Thomas, D.V.M. Ph.D., Michigan State University; and Joshua Webster, Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists.

Dr. Gary presented her work, “Decreased mTOR Delays Thymic lymphoma Formation and Leads to Concurrent Down Regulation of CDK6 in Mice with Constitutively Activated Thymic AK”, at the annual meeting of the American Association of Cancer Research, Washington, D.C., April 2013. 

 

Leah Zadrozny, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Program Graduate 2015

Current Position:  Veterinary Pathologist, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Silver Spring, MD
Publications
Dr. Zadrozny was a graduate scholar in the NIH Comparative Biomedical Scientist Training Program in partnership with North Carolina State University and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 2008 - 2015.
Thesis Title:
"Macromolecular microstructure and lipid deposition in healthy and diseased thoracic aortas in a model of atherosclerosis." 

Dr. Zadrozny received her B.S. from the University of Vermont and her D.V.M. from North Carolina State University (2008) where she also completed a residency in veterinary anatomic pathology. Her dissertation research was accomplished in  the NHLBI Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics, where she studied the aortic macromolecular microstructure in healthy and diseased SR-BI KO/ApoER61h/h mice, a recently defined model of diet-induced occlusive coronary atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease.  Her research interests are in modeling the functional pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease, with an emphasis on athersclerosis. Her Ph.D. dissertation studies were headed by principal investigator mentor Robert Balaban, Ph.D.  Members of her graduate guidance committee included Robert Balaban, Ph.D., John Cullen, V.M.D., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists, Mark Simpson, D.V.M., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists, and Edward Neufeld, Ph.D.

 

Laura Baseler, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Diplomate, ACVP
Program Graduate 2015

Photo of Laura BaselerCurrent Position: Veterinary Pathologist, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Publications
Dr. Baseler was a graduate scholar in the NIH Comparative Biomedical Scientist Training Program in partnership with Purdue University and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, July 2010 - 2015.
Thesis Title: "Comparative respiratory tract pathology of emerging viral infections."

Dr. Baseler received her B.S. and M.S. from Iowa State University. She also completed her D.V.M. degree at Iowa State University (2010). She began her graduate fellowship and pathology training in July of 2010 at Purdue University. After completion of the initial diagnostic pathology and pre-dissertation research training at the university, she relocated to Hamilton, MT for her dissertation research on emerging viral infections including Nipah virus and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus, with Heinz Feldmann, M.D., Ph.D., at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Rocky Mountain Laboratories.

Dr. Baseler received a travel award to present her work at the 32nd annual meeting of the American Society for Virology, State College, PA, July 20-24, 2013.“Histological Comparison Of Respiratory Tract Lesions In Hamsters Intranasally Inoculated With Nipah Virus Isolated From Malaysia Or Bangladesh.”

Heather Tillman, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Diplomate, ACVP
Program Graduate 2015

Photo of Heather TillmanCurrent Position: Veterinary Pathologist, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis,TN  Publications
Dr. Tillman was a graduate scholar in the NIH Comparative Biomedical Scientist Training Program in partnership with the Michigan State University and the National Cancer Institute, July 2008 - 2015.
Thesis Title:
"Dissecting the signaling mechanisms associated with Ras-driven prostate cancer metastasis."

Dr. Tillman received her B.S.A. in Animal Science from the University of Georgia (2005), her D.V.M. also from the University of Georgia (2008), and her residency certificate in Veterinary Anatomic Pathology from Michigan State University (2011). She pursued her dissertation research and training in the molecular pathology of advanced prostate cancer. Her research focused on understanding the signal transduction relating to epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity and metastatic progression using the PbCre4;PTENfl/flTP53fl/fl mouse model. Members of her graduate committee were: Matti Kiupel, Dr. Med. Vet., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologist (ACVP), Michigan State University; Kathleen Kelly, Ph.D., Laboratory of Genitourinary Cancer Pathogenesis, NCI; Vilma Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Ph.D., Michigan State University; Ingeborg Langohr, D.V.M. Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists, Michigan State University; Joshua Webster, Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists. 

Dr. Tillman received a First Place, Young Investigator Award, in Experimental Pathology, from the American College of Veterinary Pathologists, at their November 2013 meeting in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. "Deregulation of The Ras Signaling Axis Promotes Metastasis Via The Nfkb Pathway in The Pten-/-Tp53-/- Mouse Prostate Cancer Model". 

 

Tiffany (Reed) Lyle, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Diplomate, ACVP
Program Graduate 2016

Photo of Tiffany ReedCurrent Position: Assistant Professor, Purdue University, N. Lafayette, Indiana   Publications
Dr. Lyle was a graduate scholar in the NIH Comparative Biomedical Scientist Training Program in partnership with the Purdue University and the National Cancer Institute, July 2009 - 2016.
Thesis Title:
"A molecular analysis of blood-brain barrier permeability in three experimental models of brain metastasis from breast cancer". 

Dr. Lyle received her B.S. from the University of Georgia and her D.V.M. from the University of Georgia (2008), and following graduation initiated anatomic pathology residency at Purdue University’s Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory. Following one year of residency training, Dr. Lyle enrolled in the Molecular Pathology GPP as an NCI Cancer Research Training Fellow. She completed her diagnostic pathology training and didactic coursework in 2011 and continued her research training at NCI. Her academic program advisors were Margaret A. Miller, D.V.M., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists, Jose Ramos-Vara, D.V.M., Ph.D., Diplomate, The European College of Veterinary Pathologists, and Stephen Lenz, D.V.M., Ph.D., Diplomate, The American College of Veterinary Pathologists, and Patricia Steeg, Ph.D., Head, Women's Malignancies Branch. Dr. Lyle’s research interests include breast cancer metastasis to the brain and brain microenvironment.

Dr. Lyle presented her work at the American College of Veterinary Pathologists’ November 2013 meeting in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.  Her presentation was titled, "Characterization Of The Brain Microenvironment Surrounding Permeable And Impermeable Lesions In A Mouse Model Of Brain Metastatic Inflammatory Breast Cancer". 

 

Sarah Cramer, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Diplomate, ACVP
Program Graduate 2017

Photo of Sarah Cramer Current Position:  Pathologist, Tox Path Specialists, LLC in Frederick, MD
Publications
Dr. Cramer was a graduate scholar in the NIH Comparative Biomedical Scientist Training Program in partnership with University of Maryland and the National Cancer Institute, July 2011 – 2017.
Thesis Title: "Mutant IL-7R alpha and NRAS are sufficient to induce T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia."                                                                                                                                                

Prior to joining the program, Dr. Cramer received her B.A. in biology from St. Mary’s College of Maryland (2002) and her D.V.M. from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine (2008). She completed a residency in veterinary anatomic pathology at Oklahoma State University (2008 – 2011), and was board-certified by The American College of Veterinary Pathologists in 2011. In 2011, Dr. Cramer joined the CBSTP in partnership with the University of Maryland. She completed her dissertation research in the NCI Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation, headed by Scott Durum, Ph.D.

Dr. Cramer's research interests include pediatric oncology, IL-7R signaling pathways, leukemogenic genetic mutations, collaborative pathology, and digital image analysis of histology slides.

 

 

 

 

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